18 4 / 2014

Spreadsheets Are My Life (at Swift Hibernian Lounge)

Spreadsheets Are My Life (at Swift Hibernian Lounge)

17 4 / 2014

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

"Dogs in…" Which is your favorite?
…a helmet. Boston Public Library. Digital Commonwealth.
…a parade. Boston Public Library. Digital Commonwealth.
…a painting. Georgia State University. Special Collections. Digital Library of Georgia.
…sweaters. Boston Public Library. Digital Commonwealth.
…a mailbox. University of South Carolina. South Caroliniana Library. South Carolina Digital Library.
…a plane.  From the California Historical Society Collection at the University of Southern California.
…a lap AND a plane. National Archives and Records Administration.
…pants. From the California Historical Society Collection at the University of Southern California.
…a line. River Valley Pioneer Museum. The Portal to Texas History.

digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

"Dogs in…" Which is your favorite?

  1. a helmet. Boston Public Library. Digital Commonwealth.
  2. a parade. Boston Public Library. Digital Commonwealth.
  3. a painting. Georgia State University. Special Collections. Digital Library of Georgia.
  4. sweaters. Boston Public Library. Digital Commonwealth.
  5. a mailboxUniversity of South Carolina. South Caroliniana Library. South Carolina Digital Library.
  6. a plane.  From the California Historical Society Collection at the University of Southern California.
  7. a lap AND a plane. National Archives and Records Administration.
  8. pants. From the California Historical Society Collection at the University of Southern California.
  9. a line. River Valley Pioneer Museum. The Portal to Texas History.

16 4 / 2014

cisphobequeen:

stunningpicture:

This is the first picture I was given of my unborn son

congrats, ma’am. It’s a Printer Error.

cisphobequeen:

stunningpicture:

This is the first picture I was given of my unborn son

congrats, ma’am. It’s a Printer Error.

(via marras6)

14 4 / 2014

‘Pukuri’ by Boredoms is my new jam.

10 4 / 2014

porpentine:

This game will be available for 24 hours and then I am deleting it forever.

You can download it here until then.

What you do with it, whether you distribute, share, or cover it, is up to you.

Suicide is a social problem.

Suicide is a social failure.

This game will live through social means only.

This game will not be around forever because the people you fail will not be around forever.

They are never coming back.

This game’s title:

Everything you swallow will one day come up like a stone

This game’s title when you feel uncomfortable with the topic of suicide and would rather indefinitely forestall your inevitable confrontation with reality:



Anyways, this is dedicated to Sasha Menu Courey & all the others.

CW: Rape, suicide, abuse

09 4 / 2014

(Source: xenogenesis)

09 4 / 2014

08 4 / 2014

guy:

here is a cute janitor pug who likes to clean blogs

here is a cute Hungryghoast discovering the internet at age [redacted]

guy:

here is a cute janitor pug who likes to clean blogs

here is a cute Hungryghoast discovering the internet at age [redacted]

(via niub)

08 4 / 2014

theoreticalgirl:


oldtobegin:

doyourwardance:

abloodymess:

thewomanofkleenex:

oldbonesanddust:

bombsfall:

The tide of 90s nostalgia continues to rise, so I thought I’d break this out again to set the record straight.

Instead of tumblr’ing, groups of us all hung out at Dennys or the Kettle so we could smoke cigarettes (yes inside!) and talk about the alternative music we had heard rumors of and write in journals.

I don’t buy the first one. I didn’t listen to much independent music, but I listened to a little bit, because (a) even in rural areas, teenagers make bands and go play shows with other bands (b) people move in and out of areas, bringing their music with them (c) Rolling Stone used to actually review a really interesting assortment of stuff in its back pages, which is how I wound up listening to Yo La Tengo and begging my parents to take me to Dallas to see Welcome to the Dollhouse — we couldn’t make it before it left the theater, but the local video store was actually amazing, so I just rented it later.

Being from a fucking country podunk town (granted we are 50 miles from Chicago, but when you are 11-15 it feels like forever away) we still managed to know about “cool” things. If you were really interested in something (music, photography, film, skateboarding) you hunted it down. The people with outside interests sorta banded together in my school and shared info and turned each other on to other stuff (without the internet!). If you had no interest in popular culture at a time without the internet you had to work a bit harder to find alternatives, but they were there. Tape trades, writing to zines and distros and bands! Talking to people at the record store. Even in my little town I could get my hands on cool little film quarterlies and find and read about awesome films. Sure it was harder to see some films, and it wasn’t instant, but there was a big VHS trading network available; that’s how I saw some early Buñuel films and Warhol stuff. 
The internet really didn’t change everything so much. It just changed how we do it.

or you were like me and so fucking dorky and with zero friends and absolutely no way of going to a record store or hanging with the weirdo kids because they thought you were a narc even though you desperately wanted to listen to bauhaus with them. Granted, I started high school in the late 90s, but i vividly remember the 90s and people who are 22 and younger who think everyone looked like the characters in Clueless…what. Everyone wore brown. SO MUCH BROWN. 
but seriously, where are my fellow weirdos at who just hung out with their parents (no zines, no house shows, no drinking in fields, no skateboarding, no learning about records from cool older people. I came to everything on my own from crushing loneliness) because even the artsy/weirdo kids didn’t think you were cool enough?

ashley. ME. that was me. me me me me me.

This. My parents were super-strict and I didn’t go out at all. Most weekends I worked in our restaurant (if I wasn’t tied up with tennis or figure skating). I actually didn’t start interacting with kids my age who weren’t my direct classmates until I started using BBSes until 1993-94. Even though I was 40 minutes outside of NYC, it might as well have been a million miles away—going to New Brunswick (a 15 minute drive) was an enormously huge deal back in the day for me.
On top of being on my own for the first time ever, living in a big city and the technological shifts taking place, college was an enormous experience for me.


same. miss the days where i would order records without knowing at all what they would sound like. miss how profoundly un-isolating the internet was in the mid- to late 90s. miss being forced to come out of my shell in college.

theoreticalgirl:

oldtobegin:

doyourwardance:

abloodymess:

thewomanofkleenex:

oldbonesanddust:

bombsfall:

The tide of 90s nostalgia continues to rise, so I thought I’d break this out again to set the record straight.

Instead of tumblr’ing, groups of us all hung out at Dennys or the Kettle so we could smoke cigarettes (yes inside!) and talk about the alternative music we had heard rumors of and write in journals.

I don’t buy the first one. I didn’t listen to much independent music, but I listened to a little bit, because (a) even in rural areas, teenagers make bands and go play shows with other bands (b) people move in and out of areas, bringing their music with them (c) Rolling Stone used to actually review a really interesting assortment of stuff in its back pages, which is how I wound up listening to Yo La Tengo and begging my parents to take me to Dallas to see Welcome to the Dollhouse — we couldn’t make it before it left the theater, but the local video store was actually amazing, so I just rented it later.

Being from a fucking country podunk town (granted we are 50 miles from Chicago, but when you are 11-15 it feels like forever away) we still managed to know about “cool” things. If you were really interested in something (music, photography, film, skateboarding) you hunted it down. The people with outside interests sorta banded together in my school and shared info and turned each other on to other stuff (without the internet!). If you had no interest in popular culture at a time without the internet you had to work a bit harder to find alternatives, but they were there. Tape trades, writing to zines and distros and bands! Talking to people at the record store. Even in my little town I could get my hands on cool little film quarterlies and find and read about awesome films. Sure it was harder to see some films, and it wasn’t instant, but there was a big VHS trading network available; that’s how I saw some early Buñuel films and Warhol stuff. 

The internet really didn’t change everything so much. It just changed how we do it.

or you were like me and so fucking dorky and with zero friends and absolutely no way of going to a record store or hanging with the weirdo kids because they thought you were a narc even though you desperately wanted to listen to bauhaus with them. Granted, I started high school in the late 90s, but i vividly remember the 90s and people who are 22 and younger who think everyone looked like the characters in Clueless…what. Everyone wore brown. SO MUCH BROWN. 

but seriously, where are my fellow weirdos at who just hung out with their parents (no zines, no house shows, no drinking in fields, no skateboarding, no learning about records from cool older people. I came to everything on my own from crushing loneliness) because even the artsy/weirdo kids didn’t think you were cool enough?

ashley. ME. that was me. me me me me me.

This. My parents were super-strict and I didn’t go out at all. Most weekends I worked in our restaurant (if I wasn’t tied up with tennis or figure skating). I actually didn’t start interacting with kids my age who weren’t my direct classmates until I started using BBSes until 1993-94. Even though I was 40 minutes outside of NYC, it might as well have been a million miles away—going to New Brunswick (a 15 minute drive) was an enormously huge deal back in the day for me.

On top of being on my own for the first time ever, living in a big city and the technological shifts taking place, college was an enormous experience for me.

same. miss the days where i would order records without knowing at all what they would sound like. miss how profoundly un-isolating the internet was in the mid- to late 90s. miss being forced to come out of my shell in college.

07 4 / 2014